.327 Federal Magnum

.327 FedMag

.327 FedMag

As I once wrote in the comments of a post about the Ruger SP101: “Have to confess I am intrigued by the .327 FedMag, and not just because I have an unhealthy obsession with .30-bore handguns.  Everyone who has reviewed the gun/cartridge combo says it is very controllable while offering significant power.”

I can’t explain it, it’s just the way I am.  I have a soft spot for .32acp pistols, and the crowded gun safes to prove it. I have fondled many .32S&W wheelguns on sale for a song because they aren’t chambered for a bigger bullet, and considered giving them a loving home.  I feel more anticipation when handling a vintage S&W revolver in .32-20 than an identical gun in .38 Spl, but it might be the history behind that gun resting its thumb on the scales.  I have kicked the tires on many .32 H&R Mag revolvers, only to hem and haw and drift back to .38s and .357s, because yeah it’s fastER but it’s not fast ENOUGH.  The .30 Carbine version of Ruger’s Blackhawk is tempting, but a little too large.  But the .327 Federal Magnum infected me with giddy anticipation when it was announced.  It is the pinnacle of development for .30 – .32 caliber cartridges. And what a pinnacle it is.

“Docs vs. Glocks” Update

Doctor Buttinsky

Doctor Buttinsky

There are some new developments in the case of the Florida law passed to prevent doctors from asking their patients about guns.

The physician groups suing to block a new Florida law that bans doctors from asking patients about guns in their homes asked a federal judge in Miami Friday for an injunction to block enforcement of the law.

Some people, even Second Amendment supporters, have called this law an affront to the First Amendment.

We at YankeeGunNuts see this law as the natural backlash that happens when the public is victimized by an overreaching organization that has overstepped its bounds and is trying to infringe on other people’s rights.  The doctors do not want to give up their anti-gun agenda.  This latest delaying tactic is like the tantrums that the leftists and union thugs in Wisconsin are throwing right now.

Just read the comments to the article:

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Federal Guard Dog ammo

Guard Dog

Guard Dog

Federal seems to have re-branded their Expanding Full Metal Jacket ammo as their new Guard Dog self-protection line.  Users will benefit from a solid-nose bullet profile that won’t plug up, but has soft rubbery polymer under the front of the jacket, thus ensuring expansion.   (The original Expanding FMJ ammo is gone from their website.)

According to their website:

“Protect your home and loved ones with a cartridge designed exclusively for home defense. Guard Dog™ packs the terminal performance that stops threats while reducing over-penetration through walls. Guard Dog is the new benchmark for defending home and family.”

They are offering one load each for 9mm, .40S&W, and .45ACP.  The bullets are at the light end of the spectrum for bullets, 105gr for 9mm, 135gr for .40S&W and 165gr for .45ACP (same weights as the Expanding FMJ versions).   .38 and .44 fans are out of luck, for now.

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New Mossberg – Summer 2011

Heed the Swede

Heed the Swede

Mossberg (based in CT!) is the supplier of pump-action shotguns to the U.S. military.  But they made their mark in the civilian market long ago, starting in 1919.  Originally concentrating on shotguns, Mossberg has expanded to offer rimfire and centerfire rifles.  They were the first long-gun manufacturer in the U.S. to achieve ISO 9001 certification.

They have a new shotgun that could fill a need that most other brands have only tried to meet with half-measures.  (more)

New Rugers – Summer 2011

The Latest Thing

The Latest Thing

The gun industry has evolved.  Whereas manufacturers used to stick to tested designs and produce them as needed to meet demand, the gun industry has learned some new tricks from other manufacturing sectors.  They do more market research, they use more, more sophisticated, and better-targeted advertising.  And they also started creating new markets and niches that they could then service, instead of chasing the same old limited classifications of guns that used to comprise the U.S. market.

Sometimes this new marketing savvy is a good thing (subcompact carry guns) and sometimes it is a mixed bag of good and bad (ultralightweight magnum revolvers).  Some people might even consider this marketing-driven approach as a way for gun companies to make money while separating people from their money in return for a clever product that serves no legitimate need (Taurus Judge?).  Don’t misunderstand me, I like neat products and I have nothing personal against the Judge.  At the same time, based on ballistic performance, I do not believe the Judge is suitable for self defense against humans; I am not sure what purpose it serves (besides increasing sales of .410 ammunition).  But this is America, and the market shall make its own decisions.

There are some new products in the guniverse.  Let’s take a look: