Gun Ownership in a time of Civil Unrest

when-the-shit-hits-the-fan-keep-calm_SMThe aftermath of the Darren Wilson grand jury wasn’t a surprise to you was it?

While not discussing the merits of the case, the many clear signs leading up to the announcement all pointed to two conclusions: that a decision not to indict would be forthcoming, and that there would be potentially violent “protests” in Ferguson, MO and many other places.  Failing to recognize those signs would be a symptom of willful stupidity or devout liberalism.  But I repeat myself.

Some people were shocked by the decision not to indict. Such people would probably express surprise at indoor plumbing and basic arithmetic. But maybe that is a bit too harsh.  After all, with a Democrat mayor, Democrat governor, Democrat attorney general and Democrat president all stirring the pot, some liberal stalwarts might have held out hope that the “fix” was in.

Leaving aside the institutional bias of the state against prosecuting agents of that state for crimes, the autopsy results and the video evidence of Mike Brown’s criminal activities is clear, unambiguous and undeniable.  Except for Brown’s mom, anyway.  That woman needs her t-shirt money, for real.  Profiting off the death of a child that you failed to properly raise (and inciting a riot) is a right, isn’t it?  I guess yelling “set this place on fire!” in a crowded city isn’t a crime, as it would be in a theater.

Optics for Combat Rifles (updated)

Scope Expert

Scope Expert

Buying a scope for a hunting rifle is pretty straightforward: determine the terrain you will be hunting in, and the distance that you typically take your shot at, and buy a scope of suitable magnification.

Hunting prairie dogs across an uncluttered plain calls out for very high magnification.  Hunting whitetail in the Northeast probably means dense forest among the hills, and the shots that present themselves to a hunter will be much closer; less magnification is better for that.  Variable magnification scopes give hunters extra versatility, but even with modern technology there are real and practical limits to what a scope can do.  Shooting in low light (when hunting coyotes, for instance) calls out for an illuminated reticle, which is a more common feature in the last 10 years.

A scope for combat has different requirements, because there are so many different kinds of combat.