The cupboard is bare (mostly)

Where da white boxes at?

Where da white boxes at?

Like the rest of you, I am feeling the effects of the ammo shortage.

I am using .22 guns for practice as often as possible.  Why?  Because 9mm is nearly impossible to find.  Not surprising, given its popularity.  .223 range ammo (as opposed to defensive/hunting loads) is scarce too.  I prefer not to deplete my reserves until that becomes unavoidable.  The similarity of the Ruger SR22 to many tactical pistols (in terms of ergonomics and sights) makes it a good alternative for low-cost practice.

What is surprising is how much .380 I am seeing still on shelves.  Also, .45acp is usually available, and most of the time .40S&W too.

There’s a lot of factors at play in this shortage; war production, other government contracts, panic buying, hoarding, etc.  I cannot say if there is any opportunism or profiteering going on, beyond a few unscrupulous dealers that I make a habit of avoiding. I would imagine that it is a good time to be in the ammo manufacturing business.  None of their product will sit idle waiting for a buyer.

Retailers are weary of getting phone calls from ammo-seeking customers.  Many of us have uncovered the delivery schedules for our local retailers, and are scheduling visits to coincide with the deliveries to ensure first crack at any ammo they get.

The shooting ranges that I frequent have ammo to supply their shooting customers thus far; they are sick of being asked to sell it to retail customers.  One owner hides the boxes so that people won’t see them and ask to buy it.

Hope it loosens up soon…

 

Range Rules, part 2

Range Rules

Range Rules

(Updated) We have posted about range rules before, specifically the issue of ammo restrictions and brass retention policies.

Another set of rules that many shooters encounter is restrictions on the amount or frequency of shooting.

While it is common for publicly-accessible ranges to exclude full-auto weapons, certain ranges take the principle farther.  Some ranges limit the number of shots you are supposed to take without a pause between them (a “5-shot rule” or a “no rapid fire/double-tap rule”).  Others limit the number of rounds you put into the magazine.  One range (according to a commenter in this post by SayUncle) doesn’t allow semi-auto rifles to be fired with a magazine inserted!

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Sporting Wood

Got Wood?

Got Wood?

I have always liked the look of a Mannlicher stock.  They just seem…old school, traditional, classy.  I have read that the style originated from the need to use a longarm as a walking stick in the hilly parts of Europe.

Yes, I know that the barrel isn’t free-floating.

Yes, I know that the full-length stock might change the point of impact when the gun heats up.

Don’t care.  Maybe it’s an engineering-centric preference, with the barrel being “protected” by the full-length stock.  Or maybe it’s aesthetic, with no skinny barrel sticking out “unsupported” to offend anyone’s sensibilities.  Whatever the reason, guns with Mannlicher stocks draw my attention, pop into my head for no reason, and make me dawdle at gun show tables.  But I hadn’t pulled the trigger on one, so to speak.

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Pointless Practice

Who needs skills?

Who needs skills?

Not every gun owner practices as much as they ought to.

I understand why: our lives are full and guns don’t nag as loudly as spouses do; dragging our gear to the nearest range (which might not be so near) is a hassle; range-time and ammo cost money; and cleaning guns can be a chore.

But we all need to practice, and I am glad to see people taking the time and bearing the expense to do it.

Except when they aren’t “practicing” to get better, and they’re just wasting ammo & making noise.

There is a time and a place to do that and it is fun.  I have done it, so have most shooters.  It’s cathartic, it’s more fun than manually unloading a magazine.  But you don’t become a better shooter by setting the bar absurdly low and then failing to meet even that low standard.

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Range Rules

Range Rules

Range Rules

A post over at Gun Nuts Media got me thinking about ammo restrictions at shooting ranges.  Indoor ranges, specifically.

There are all different kinds of steel, and backstops are made to stop a specific caliber/composition of bullet (much like bullet-resistant vests are rated to stop up to a certain caliber).  If you increase the power of the bullet over the rating of the backstop, or use bullets that are harder/denser than the backstop is rated for, the backstop will be damaged or even penetrated.

Some ranges ban magnum calibers.  Ok, fine, if the backstop can’t take it that’s just the way it is.

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