Charter Arms Pitbull – Update

Just Sayin'

Just Sayin’

Many moons ago, we tested the Charter Arms Pitbull revolvers, which fire rimless cartridges.  We tested both the .40S&W and 9mm versions:

Well, Charter recently announced that they were redesigning the Pitbull to reduce capacity from 6 rounds to 5, in the interest of improving spent case extraction, which was one of the problems we encountered when we tested them.

While that would remedy one of the problems that we identified with the Pitbull, it won’t address the others.


Scout Rifles



Everybody likes new things. And the advertising practices of the past 50 years have deepened and solidified our hunger for new things beyond the limits of common sense.

How else to explain the mad dash to ditch a perfectly good smartphone when a new model (that is functionally 97% identical to the old model, and light-years better than the phones of 5 years ago) is released?  IT managers were not hallucinating when they observed an increase in broken phones when a new iPhone was released. You can’t have bread & circuses without the bread.

Guns are not immune to this trend. When something bigger/smaller/faster/shinier comes out, we all salivate a little. Senator Phil Gramm once described the size of his arsenal as “more than I need, but not as many as I want”.  A smart consumer should mitigate his/her urge to acquire new hardware with the knowledge of: budget priorities, how easy it will be to get ammo/parts/accessories, reliability of warranty coverage, and whether or not the gun is chambered for a caliber that he/she already supports.  No one is saying that those are rules to adhere to at all times.  But you need to weigh all the factors against your personal situation before deciding. Bullets without a gun to shoot them are as useless as a gun with no bullets.

Cheap Guns



Kahr Arms has been pursuing a 2-tiered product strategy for a few years now. When they entered the market, they sold high-quality pistols at pricepoints higher than Glock.  They now sell a high-end version of a gun, as well as a low-end version.  The potential benefit is access to a category of customers that normally wouldn’t be considering your product.  The risk in such strategies is that you might negatively impact the sales of the high-end gun more than you gain from the sales of the low-end gun; and that you might dilute your brand’s perception.  The vendor must be careful in designing their product tiers to clearly differentiate the tiers for the customer.


The Experts Agree: The 1911 Sucks!



I promised Crapgame that I wouldn’t gloat.

But a very well-known gunblogger and 1911 gunsmith has come out against the 1911 design:

Hilton Yam: My Personal Path Away From The 1911

SaysUncle picked up the story, and it’s going to get a lot of attention.


Shooting Aftermath: Analysis and Lessons

Pile On!

Pile On!

A story has been circulating in the gun blog world, a podcast interview with a crime victim as well as the original thread where he posted his story.

After listening & reading, I (like many others) believe that there are lessons to be learned from this man’s unfortunate experience.

What those lessons are may depend heavily on the biases that you bring to the analysis.

This guy has beaten himself up plenty over this incident, and I am not trying to pile on.  But he made some major errors that are entirely correctable.